Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story

DIRECTOR’S BIOGRAPHY

Daniel Raim
Writer/Director

Academy Award®-nominated Writer-Director Daniel Raim attended the American Film Institute in Los Angeles, where he studied under one of Alfred Hitchcock’s most esteemed collaborators, Production Designer Robert F. Boyle. Daniel’s award winning documentaries are inspired in part from Boyle’s creative philosophies and humanist approach to cinema.

Daniel is known for his trilogy of documentaries about unsung heroes of Hollywood’s Golden Age.

His debut film, an intimate profile on Boyle entitled The Man on Lincoln’s Nose (2000, 40 min), was nominated for the 2000 Academy Award® for Best Documentary Short Subject.

His second film, Something’s Gonna Live (2010, 78 min), confirmed his talent as a director and storyteller and premiered at the AFI Film Fest. Something’s Gonna Live was critically acclaimed during its theatrical release, and received a Los Angeles Times Critics’ Pick from Kenneth Turan.

His third film, Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story (2015, 94) premiered as an Official Selection of the 2015 Cannes Film Festival, and nominated for The Golden Eye Award.

Daniel has a passion for education, and in 2016 he embarked on an academic tour through India, where he screened his trilogy and lectured on cinema literacy and the art and craft of documentary filmmaking.

Danielis currently creating a series of short films focusing on the art of design forthe Criterion Channel on FilmStruck. Haroldand Lillian will be theatrically released in April 2017, followed by thetelevision premiere on Turner Classic Movies (TCM).

You can follow Daniel’s work on:

AdamaFilms.com
HaroldAndLillian.com

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Press for Daniel’s Films:

Cineaste Magazine writes on The Man on Lincoln’s Nose: “A welcome gift to everyone anywhere who wants to know what has and continues to make Hollywood Hollywood!”

The Chicago Sun-Times called Something’s Gonna Live, “A revelation! … An eye-opening tribute to one of the least understood or appreciated aspects of filmmaking, and a challenge to filmmakers to believe in what they do!”

Vanity Fair raves about Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story, calling it, “A wonderful paradox: an educational tearjerker.”

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